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As you can probably guess by his moniker – Le Perlouze – our artist for January hails from Paris in the very heart of France. His name is a combination of the words Pearl and Tarlouze – Pearl being quite obvious when you take a look at his work and Tarlouze which is hard French street slang for gay.

I am sure that years ago many of you have made a similar treasure for your mom or auntie from these familiar plastic pearls that Perlouze uses to create his characters. He started with this same idea using a simple versatile material usually available from a toy or craft store. These multicolored polyethylene beads are actually marketed for children. They were conceived in Denmark in 1984 making the following promise right on their package, „these pearls foster fun games that are are based on experimentation.“

And that is just what Perlouze does here, nothing more and nothing less. He playfully renders in plastic mosaics the strong connection and fascination he has with contemporary gay culture – creating masculine and virile characters from these colourful pearls.

With this unique medium Perlouze creates stylized compositions featuring scenes from both the special times and everyday life of our world. Pulling examples from gay consumer sources like magazines, sex shops, smartphone apps, cruising bars, websites and local sex clubs, Perlouze offers his amused and amusing vision of these practices via his pixelated creations. Pearls are used as pixels to provide a colourful graphic that evokes the 8-bit computer images from the days of the old school video games like Space Invaders, PacMan and Super Mario.

The low tech capacity of 8 bit game consoles of that time forced the designers to create simply detailed characters and settings with a basic graphic unit called Pixel which is the English abbreviation of Picture and Element – this is mirrored by the same blending of the words Pearl and Tarlouze that form the artist‘s name – Perlouze.

Like many people who grew up in the 80s, the artist‘s childhood was marked by the explosion of the video game industry. But in the years that followed the graphics of these video games quickly evolved from simple abstractions to hyperrealism and from 2D to 3D.

It is however, this abstract charm of the very first games that heavily influenced Perlouze. Now in the 21st century, a few artists have appropriated the style of video game icons from the 80‘s and turned away from the super advanced developments of the fast paced digital world to create their grid based art with ceramic tiles, cross stitch, post-its and even as we see here – plastic beads.

Perlouze remembers first discovering this pixel based art on Nathan Mahon, the lead singer of an Australian elektro pop band. He wore a huge pixelated Game Boy around his neck while preforming on stage. That‘s when Perlouze first said, „I want to make this art!“

Then in 2014 he bought his first bead kit and began to reproduce the characters in video games but very quickly his creations became more focused on the themes of bear culture, mansex and fetishes of gay community. Perlouze and his partner decided to share the first art creations in 2014 and the rest is history.

Black Boot for Boner Magazine

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As you can probably guess by his moniker – Le Perlouze – our artist for January hails from Paris in the very heart of France. His name is a combination of the words Pearl and Tarlouze – Pearl being quite obvious when you take a look at his work and Tarlouze which is hard French street slang for gay.

I am sure that years ago many of you have made a similar treasure for your mom or auntie from these familiar plastic pearls that Perlouze uses to create his characters. He started with this same idea using a simple versatile material usually available from a toy or craft store. These multicolored polyethylene beads are actually marketed for children. They were conceived in Denmark in 1984 making the following promise right on their package, „these pearls foster fun games that are are based on experimentation.“

And that is just what Perlouze does here, nothing more and nothing less. He playfully renders in plastic mosaics the strong connection and fascination he has with contemporary gay culture – creating masculine and virile characters from these colourful pearls.

With this unique medium Perlouze creates stylized compositions featuring scenes from both the special times and everyday life of our world. Pulling examples from gay consumer sources like magazines, sex shops, smartphone apps, cruising bars, websites and local sex clubs, Perlouze offers his amused and amusing vision of these practices via his pixelated creations. Pearls are used as pixels to provide a colourful graphic that evokes the 8-bit computer images from the days of the old school video games like Space Invaders, PacMan and Super Mario.

The low tech capacity of 8 bit game consoles of that time forced the designers to create simply detailed characters and settings with a basic graphic unit called Pixel which is the English abbreviation of Picture and Element – this is mirrored by the same blending of the words Pearl and Tarlouze that form the artist‘s name – Perlouze.

Like many people who grew up in the 80s, the artist‘s childhood was marked by the explosion of the video game industry. But in the years that followed the graphics of these video games quickly evolved from simple abstractions to hyperrealism and from 2D to 3D.

It is however, this abstract charm of the very first games that heavily influenced Perlouze. Now in the 21st century, a few artists have appropriated the style of video game icons from the 80‘s and turned away from the super advanced developments of the fast paced digital world to create their grid based art with ceramic tiles, cross stitch, post-its and even as we see here – plastic beads.

Perlouze remembers first discovering this pixel based art on Nathan Mahon, the lead singer of an Australian elektro pop band. He wore a huge pixelated Game Boy around his neck while preforming on stage. That‘s when Perlouze first said, „I want to make this art!“

Then in 2014 he bought his first bead kit and began to reproduce the characters in video games but very quickly his creations became more focused on the themes of bear culture, mansex and fetishes of gay community. Perlouze and his partner decided to share the first art creations in 2014 and the rest is history.

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Black Boot for Boner Magazine

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HINTERLASSE EINE ANTWORT

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